starlady: the cover from Shaun Tan's The Arrival, showing an aquanaut in suburbia (i'm a stranger here myself)
Currently classified as a 3.9, lasted longer, probably about two seconds. Epicenter less than half a mile from my house, again right on the fault (again on UC Berkeley property). 

At this point my hope is that I'm in my (very earthquake-survivable) house when the big one hits. 
starlady: the cover from Shaun Tan's The Arrival, showing an aquanaut in suburbia (i'm a stranger here myself)
4.0, ~one second long, less than one mile from where I'm sitting. If it had lasted any longer I'd have gotten under my desk. No damage. 

The epicenter was SE of the main Berkeley campus, under one of the dorms, right on the Hayward fault. Note to self: buy some flats of water and non-perishable food this weekend.
starlady: Raven on a MacBook (Default)
We just had a rather dramatic (short, intense wave-like motion) earthquake here in Berkeley--it felt about an M3 by us, which makes sense given that it was apparently a shallow 3.6 at the epicenter, with a 2.3 aftershock. Yes, Hayward fault, we know you're there, please don't feel like you need to remind us of that fact. (Except, of course, small earthquakes relieve the tension that accumulates to cause big earthquakes, but not enough to actually avert the latter.)

Which of course would not be notable at all except that today there were earthquakes felt in all four time zones of the continental U.S. It may well be paranoia (it is paranoia, but the sensible kind), but I've had a particularly bad feeling about earthquakes in the past week or so (the dream yesterday didn't help). I hope that was a pre-echo of today, but I tend to doubt it.

Earthquake kit, ahoy.


Originally posted at Dreamwidth Studios; you can comment there using OpenID or a DW account.
starlady: Raven on a MacBook (Default)
We just had a rather dramatic (short, intense wave-like motion) earthquake here in Berkeley--it felt about an M3 by us, which makes sense given that it was apparently a shallow 3.6 at the epicenter, with a 2.3 aftershock. Yes, Hayward fault, we know you're there, please don't feel like you need to remind us of that fact. (Except, of course, small earthquakes relieve the tension that accumulates to cause big earthquakes, but not enough to actually avert the latter.)

Which of course would not be notable at all except that today there were earthquakes felt in all four time zones of the continental U.S. It may well be paranoia (it is paranoia, but the sensible kind), but I've had a particularly bad feeling about earthquakes in the past week or so (the dream yesterday didn't help). I hope that was a pre-echo of today, but I tend to doubt it.

Earthquake kit, ahoy.

starlady: The Keyblade in purple.  (light of kingdom hearts)
Yesterday morning I dreamed that a major earthquake struck Kyoto while I was there. In the dream I was in some teahouse-type place down around Gojô-zaka, which slid partway down the hillside secondary to all the shaking--the earthquake was a 6 or a 7--with us inside it. In the dream I had that resigned nervousness of knowing that you're either going to live or die and there's nothing you can do about it either way so you just have to wait to see what it will be. Afterward once we confirmed our identities and being alive with the authorities (note: this is not how earthquake protocols actually go, in Japan) my primary emotion was annoyance that I was going to have to walk all the way home from Gojô to Matsugasaki.

I did feel a few earthquakes while I was in Kyoto this time; they were all 1s or 2s. I've at least gotten over my clueless habit of thinking, when I lived closer to the fault that runs under Kyoto University, of thinking the jolt quakes it throws off fairly frequently--a 3 or 4, lasting a second or less--were cars driving into my building.


I went to Tokyo for the weekend three weeks ago. I was there for about sixty hours, all told, and there were three aftershocks that I and my friends H & H felt, one of them large enough to wake us up from a sound sleep at three or four on Sunday morning (so a 3 or a 4). Worryingly, that one didn't send an alert to my friend H's smartphone. My friend H, who moved to Tokyo the week after the earthquake, still has an ancient cell phone that she bought used when we arrived in Japan four years ago, and can't get the earthquake alerts, but she was telling me how, in the weeks afterward when subway service was initially restored, they couldn't keep the subway to a schedule (!) because of the aftershocks, and how she'd be riding around and the cell phone of everyone in the compartment would go off with the earthquake alert ringtone and the train would stop and she'd just have to clutch the bar and hope that it wasn't a big one.

I suppose I'm telling this story to make a point about how much fortitude going about your daily life can require at times, in a place like Tokyo, and I do hand it to the people there who've endured blackouts, energy saving, and aftershocks for months on end. But the Japanese government recently confirmed what, I think, everyone had long known, that the 12-mile exclusion zone around Fukushima Daiichi won't be habitable again for a long time, if ever, and people who lived there won't be allowed to go back, and I've seen the photos and heard the stories from people who've been volunteering in or visiting the tsunami zone (Google Maps/Earth of Minamisanriku-chô is currently using satellite photos from April), and…Tokyo is so far from being the worst off it almost doesn't merit mentioning in the same sentence.

When the big one hits Tokyo, though, it'll be a different story.

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starlady: Raven on a MacBook (Default)
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